My name is Cornelius Wangila Sikuku. I am the 4th born in a family of six children. 

I was born way back in 1989 in Tuuti-Kibabii, Bungoma. In 1994, my father sold our ancestral land in Kibabii and opted to move and settle in Kolani. 

He bought a two-acre piece of land near Kolani primary school on which he erected a single grass-thatched house. We settled quickly and soon I was enrolled in class one in Kolani primary school.

My father became a well-known charcoal burner around Kolani. It was his new way of earning income to keep the family going. 

In 1996, a legal proceeding was instituted in Bungoma Law Courts claiming that my father and other buyers had bought the land at Kolani without following the right procedure. 

The complainant, claimed that succession had not been done to divide the land among the family members. 

A single member of the family had secretly sold off the land, without involving other members of the family.
The case dragged on for years, characterized by summons, mentions, adjournments, stay of proceedings and other legal excuses. Life was getting difficult day by day.

My elder brothers dropped out of school before sitting for their KCPE due to lack of school fees. 

My elder sister braved financial difficulties and frustrations and sat for her KCPE examination in 2001, scoring a decent 306 marks out of the possible 500. 

However, her dream of joining secondary school never reached fruition. There was no means of facilitating her further studies. 

She grew frustrated and eventually nature natured her into a diligent house girl, working in Nairobi. Later in 2007 she decided to get married.

The land case reached its climax in 2004. The defendants, including our family, were evicted from the land and our houses set ablaze.  

I had just completed my KCPE examinations. After the incident, we were rendered landless and homeless. My parents separated due to frustrations and financial difficulties. 

I and my younger brother followed my mother. She rented a house at Luucho near Kanduyi and started making traditional brew to keep us going. Later that December, the KCPE results were released. I had scored 347 marks out of the maximum 500. 

I received an admission letter to join Kimilii Boys High School but there were no school fees. I was unable to join secondary school. 

In 2005 I was employed to take care of exotic cattle in a zero-grazing unit in Bungoma town for Ksh. 900 per month. 

I did the work up the year 2008 when I decided to go back to standard 8 and sit for KCPE again. 
This was largely because the NARC government had introduced free primary education. I was subjected to an interview at Chemwa Primary School, which I fortunately passed well and impressed the teachers. I was registered for KCPE.

Later that year, 2008, I sat for my KCPE ‘second attempt’, attaining 410 marks out of 500. 

I received a letter of admission to Mangu High School and was fortunate to get sponsorship from the Jomo Kenyatta Foundation. I sat for my KCSE in 2012 and attained grade A, 81 points. 

I joined the University of Nairobi in 2014 for the Bachelor of Laws. I applied for the HELB loan that saw me through the degree program. 

Although I experienced some challenges at campus due to insufficient upkeep money, I am glad that I completed my degree program successfully, graduating in December 2018 with a Bachelor of Laws degree (second class hounours, lower division).

I returned home, hoping that I would manage to hustle and get some funds to enable me join the Kenya School of Law for the advocacy training program.
 Unfortunately, I have been unable to raise the fees, which lies in the region of KSH.240,000. 

I have tried to reach out to some leaders in my area but they are simply ‘too busy’ to hear me out.  I would be grateful for any form of assistance that would help   see me through the Kenya School of Law.

Reach Cornelius Wangila  Sikuku.0710322375 or 0707034508

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